Well hey, y’all! I’m Olivia from DIY Mother and today I’m sharing a little painting experiment I conducted over the weekend: saran wrap-painted coasters.

I love experimenting with new painting techniques, and I often apply them to my DIY projects. When I saw these Sharpie and alcohol coasters, I knew I had to experiment with a new and funky way of painting coasters. For some reason, I never get tired of making coasters. It’s cheap and you can update them to meet your ever-evolving home.

I looked up painting techniques that involved texture, and stumbled across a tutorial on using saran wrap to create texture with acrylic or watercolor paint. I decided to try the technique on some cheap white tiles; at less than $1 a piece, I wouldn’t be losing much if they turned out horribly.

But they didn’t. In fact, they turned out pretty neat.

DIY_saranwrap_painted_coasters_supplies

Materials I used:

  • Acrylic paints (various colors)
  • White tiles (I found them cheapest here (at 80 cents a pop)
  • Saran wrap
  • Mod Podge
  • Paint brushes
  • Corkboard (for base)

Clean the tiles off with a damp rag. Squirt a bit of paint (whatever colors you choose) onto the tile, dip your paint brush in water, and start mixing the colors. Use a generous amount of water. Move the tile around in your hand and let the paint run down the tile.

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DIY_saranwrap_painted_coasters_mixingpaint

Mine looked like this when I decided it was good enough to stop:

DIY_saranwrap_painted_coasters_wetpaint

When you’re satisfied with how your tile looks, rip off a sheet of saran wrap and crumble it up. You want to get it nice and wrinkly: the more wrinkles, the better. Then, cover the tile completely and scrunch up the saran wrap. It should look like this:

DIY_saranwrap_painted_coasters_saranwrap

Let it dry overnight, but preferably for 24 hours. Here’s how mine turned out:

DIY_saranwrap_painted_coasters_dry

I probably had too much acrylic paint on one side, since it was still a little wet when I took the saran wrap off. Here’s one where I used more water than paint:

DIY_saranwrap_painted_coasters_finished

So, you get more of the saran wrap effect if you use more water and less paint. It will also dry faster. Keep that in mind if you’re the kind of person (like me) who is a bit too heavy-handed and liberal with materials. When all of your tiles have completely dried, cover them with glossy Mod Podge and adhere some corkboard to the bottoms.

DIY_saranwrap_painted_coasters_modpodge

And you’re done!

DIY_saranwrap_painted_coasters_finalproduct

Do I think they turned out better than the Sharpie and alcohol coasters? Probably not, but it’s a new and different way of painting coasters, and I think it might be a fun project for the kids.

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About our Guest Blogger:

Howdy! I’m Olivia. I’m a 28 year old mother to two rambunctious little girls, and wife to a handsomely handy contractor. Our family purchased our first home last year, and since then we’ve been embarking on any DIY renovation project we can dream up; I’ve also become a bit of a decorating nerd. I blog about my DIY highs and lows at DIY Mother, but in my free time I’m either pinning or Googling pictures of Ryan Gosling (it never gets old). You can also find me on Pinterest and Twitter.